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Freedom at Last

When life gets tough, it's so easy for me to forget just who God is and what He's done for me. I, of all people, should remember just how good He's been to me and the countless ways He's shown me grace and love. Yet I forget. Yet His mercies are still new every day (Lamentations 3:22-23).

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Return to Egypt

Once you've made it through, once you're out of the valley glancing back on it with a sigh of relief, you know God better. Love is patient (1 Corinthians 13:4), and God is love (1 John 4:8), and we begin to realize just how patient God is with us. That He lets us stomp and scream and shove Him and beat our feeble hands against His chest. We see just how faithful He is (Hebrews 10:23) even when we're not. It's not easy to see all of that at the bottom, but that's where we experience it the most.

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Floating Through the Reeds

But the very same God who created Moses and orchestrated this whole survival plan did the same for you. Chances are, your story is less dramatic. That doesn't make it less important or less touched by God. Think of all the things that you've overcome, that could've destroyed you, that you could've succumbed to. But you prevailed with God's help, whether you recognize it or not, whether you acknowledge it or not. All the things that could've defeated you and you're still standing. You're a baby floating through the reeds of the Nile as much as Moses was.

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Revisiting the Mount

The first step to being gospel-centered is knowing the gospel and the key players in it, and this is achieved by reading the Gospels. In doing this, we know the life and sacrifice of Jesus firsthand. We don't rely on what we hear from others, which can be distorted or lacking insight. We can know Jesus through scripture just as we come to know Him in our own lives. We go deeper, and it becomes harder to lose sight of Him. To know Him is to want to know Him more, and we get that in a large part from reading the Gospels.

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